The Girl in the Glass Tower

Tap. Tap. Tap on the window.

Something, someone, wanting to be heard. Waiting to be free.
Tudor England. The word treason is on everyone’s lips. Arbella Stuart, niece to Mary, Queen of Scots and presumed succesor to Elizabeth I, has spent her youth behind the towering windows of Hardwick Hall. As presumed sucessor to the throne, her isolation should mean protection – but those close to the crown are never safe.
Aemilia Lanyer – writer and poet – enjoys an independence denied to Arbella. Their paths should never cross. But when Arbella enlists Aemilia’s help in a bid for freedom, she risks more than her own future. Ensnared in another woman’s desperate schemes, Aemilia must tread carefully or share her terrible fate…
The Girl in the Glass Tower brilliantly explores what it means to be born a woman in a man’s world where destiny is strictly controlled and the smallest choices may save – or destroy – us.

Reviews:

‘Fremantle is triumphant in breathing life into her real, damaged character. Beware: the end is heartbreaking. If you read one Tudor tome this summer, make it this one.’ The Times.

‘The Girl in the Glass Tower is a top-notch literary thriller in which shots are fired, troths are plighted, sea voyages taken, escapes dared and mysteries solved.’ The Saturday Telegraph

‘An enthralling, powerful tale about the life of a prickly, unhappy woman.’ The Times on Saturday Summer Reading Review 

 ‘Filled with dense, dark political and social intrigue, this is five-star historical fiction.’ The Daily Mail

‘A compelling recreation of a life torn apart by Tudor politics.’ Woman and Home.

‘It’s an eloquent novel, steeped in Tudor literary culture.’ The Daily Express

‘Arbella Stuart was a pawn, at the mercy of the powerful people around her. Hers is a sad and moving tale, and Fremantle tells it beautifully.’ The History Girls

‘Sharp, perceptive and dramatic’ Sunday Express

‘Rich and enticing’ Stylist

‘Haunting, emotional and thought-provoking, The Girl in the Glass Tower is a beautiful foray into the past.’ Lovereading.com

 ‘A superb evocation of an age.’ – Sunday Times Books of the Year