Broken Soup

When the good-looking boy with the American accent presses the dropped negative into Rowan’s hand, she’s sure it’s all a big mistake. But next moment he’s gone, lost in the crowd of bustling shoppers. And she can’t afford to lose her place in the checkout queue — after all, if she doesn’t take the groceries home, nobody else will. Rowan has more responsibilities than most girls her age. These days, she pretty much looks after her little sister single-handedly — which doesn’t leave much time for friends or fun. So when she finds out that Bee from school saw the whole thing, it piques her curiosity. Who was the boy? Why was he so insistent that the negative belonged to Rowan?

Praise for Broken Soup

‘Broken Soup is one of this year’s un-missable reads… Valentine has the essential storyteller’s gift of making you want to read on – and to know more even after the book is finished. The writing moves with an athletic spring… Much of the success of Broken Soup comes from Valentine’s skilful dialogue – ringing with the cadences of now without descending into patois that would date the book instantly… For all the tears you may shed on the way, Broken Soup is a joy to read’.
The Guardian

‘Valentine’s appeal lies in conveying life and hope; the radiance of first love is given depth by the dark backdrop of death, but the strength of family affection is stronger and more touching’
The Times

US edition
Fifteen-year-old Rowan—clever, introspective and stressed—is holding her grieving, broken family together with elbow grease and well-told lies… The narrative takes several dramatic turns … but Valentine handles each one with a light touch, letting Rowan’s warmth and grit, as well as her loneliness and resentment shine through on each page. This is rich, satisfying storytelling, indeed.
Kirkus, starred review

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